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Poster: William Tell Date: Dec 4, 2006 12:18pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The whole damn Dancinbears thing

Hey--just why do you want to know? Are you compiling, profiling and otherwise planning to abuse this gem of information if I provide it? I thought we decided I am to be anonymous.

Seriously, though; out west in 'mtn time' so 7 hrs behind you. Loved most all of London, and the people, especially the beer and the food (even). Now, you are to the north, in Scotland, if I recall? I must say that as a good Irish member of the world wide drinking club, some good Irish whiskey (even if not up to the standard you all were speaking of recently) is quite fine; more to my liking than scotch...

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Poster: direwolf0701 Date: Dec 4, 2006 12:36pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The whole damn Dancinbears thing

can you explain to me the "real" difference between an something like a good irish whiskey and a good scotch - they at times seem similar although i've rarely had them side by side (sorry to sound like a total moron).

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Poster: Earl B. Powell Date: Dec 4, 2006 1:16pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The whole damn Dancinbears thing

Wiki Wiki Dire

Irish whiskey is a grain whiskey made in Ireland. There are several types of whiskey common to Ireland: Single Malt, Pure Pot Still and Blended Whiskey.

Note the difference in how the Irish spell "whiskey" (with an "e") and how the Scottish spell it—"whisky". There is no known reason, legal or otherwise why this difference exists.[citation needed]Peat is almost never used in the malting process, resulting in a whiskey with an arguably smoother, sweeter flavour. In most Irish whiskey, the smoky, earthy overtones of Scotch are absent. A notable exception to this is Connemara Peated Malt whiskey.

The word whiskey is an Anglicization of the Irish language term "uisce beatha" which translates as "water of life". Craythur is an Irish term for whiskey.

There are far fewer distilleries of Irish whiskey than there are distillers of Scotch. Economic difficulties in the last couple of centuries have led to great number of mergers and closures. Currently there are only three distilleries operating in Ireland (although each produces a number of different whiskeys): Midleton, Bushmills, and Cooley. Only Cooley's is Irish-owned.


More Irish Whiskeys
Irish whiskey comes in several forms. There is a single malt whiskey made from 100% malted barley distilled in a pot still, and a grain whiskey made from grains distilled in a column still. Grain whiskey is much lighter and more neutral in flavour than single malt and is almost never bottled as a single grain. It is instead used to blend with single malt to produce a lighter blended whiskey. Unique to Irish whiskey is pure pot still whiskey (100% barley, both malted and unmalted, distilled in a pot still). The "green" unmalted barley gives the pure pot still whiskey a spicy, uniquely Irish quality. Like single malt, pure pot still is sold as such or blended with grain whiskey. Usually no real distinction is made between whether a blended whiskey was made from single malt or pure pot still.

Irish whiskey is believed to be one of the earliest distilled beverages in Europe, dating to the mid-12th century (see Distilled beverage). The Old Bushmills Distillery lays claim to being the oldest licenced distillery in the world since gaining a licence from James I in 1608.

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Poster: direwolf0701 Date: Dec 4, 2006 1:30pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The whole damn Dancinbears thing

didn't think of good ol' Wiki :)

thanks for that man - good read!

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Poster: William Tell Date: Dec 4, 2006 1:29pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The whole damn Dancinbears thing

Thanks Earl; will forward to my kid (just 21; loves all things Irish). Not that I want him to necessarily drink like all his uncles, but...

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Poster: Earl B. Powell Date: Dec 4, 2006 12:56pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The whole damn Dancinbears thing

Yup, and if you want to avoid starting a whole new "hater" thread, give the right Irishman the wrong color whiskey. Bushmills is the orange while Jameson is the "green."

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Poster: direwolf0701 Date: Dec 4, 2006 1:01pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The whole damn Dancinbears thing

no kiddin huh??

thankfully i leave my irish politics out of my whiskey choices - i like both of them :)

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Poster: William Tell Date: Dec 4, 2006 12:47pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The whole damn Dancinbears thing

I cannot, but I think Rob can...? I do detect the hint of an iodine (don't hit me) like flavor--something a bit astringent (!?) in scotch, even the best, that doesn't sit well with me, but really good Jameson's (remember--Bushmills is made by, ahem, the 'other guys' and if you have to ask who the good guys and the bad guys are, don't because we don't want the forum to get REALLY ugly), especially the stuff for $40-60 a bottle at the local trendy shops is just outstanding.

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Poster: direwolf0701 Date: Dec 4, 2006 12:54pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The whole damn Dancinbears thing

i love them both, but no one has ever been able to explain the difference to me. rob????????

this may remain a mystery!! maybe it is better that way?

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Dec 4, 2006 12:30pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The whole damn Dancinbears thing

Ahhh.. now then Mr Tell - I originate from Scotland but I'm currently in England and I'm quite partial to a drop of the good stuff such as a Jamiesons or a Powers from Ireland. At one time I worked near an excellent pub where Patrick the Irish landlord would make frequent trips to the home country and come back with a supply of poteen for the regulars. It was quite remarkable stuff - one of the smoothest drinks I ever had, but with quite a kick too!